D.W. Griffith’s_Enoch Arden (1911)

Enoch Arden is a two-part 1911 short silent drama film, based on the Tennyson poem of the same name. It was directed by D. W. Griffith, starred Wilfred Lucas and featured Blanche Sweet. A print of the film survives in the film archive of the Library of Congress.[1]

Plot
Part 1: The story is set in an 18th century fishing village, and concerns a romantic triangle involving fisherman Enoch Arden, his girlfriend Annie Lee, and a wealthy rival named Philip Ray. Enoch wins the girl, they marry, and after a few years they have three children. In order to provide for his young family Enoch chooses to go to sea on a fishing vessel for an extended voyage, over the objections of Annie Lee. When the ship founders, Enoch and two other sailors make their way to an island, but his shipmates die, leaving Enoch the sole survivor. Annie Lee, meanwhile, anxiously watches for his return while Philip Ray stands by.

Part 2: The years have passed since Enoch was shipwrecked alone on an island. His wife Annie Lee has continued to watch for his return while their two children have grown to adolescence. Enoch’s rival, Philip Ray, gently tries to persuade Annie Lee that he won’t be coming home, and that she should consider remarriage. With the children urging her along, she is eventually persuaded to wed Philip Ray, to close the little cottage she shared with Enoch, and to move with the children into her new husband’s more spacious home.

Enoch, now living on his island like a miserable Robinson Crusoe, is finally rescued, but comes home to find his cottage deserted. Taking a room at an inn he learns of the marriage of Annie Lee and Philip Ray from a local gossip who doesn’t recognize him. Enoch goes to Philip Ray’s house, gazes into a window, and sees his grown children with their stepfather and Annie Lee, the latter holding a newborn baby. Realizing that his presence could only cause more grief, Enoch goes back to the inn where he dies of a broken heart.

Even though Biograph would limit him to one-reelers, DW Griffith had ambitions to move on to longer films. Once or twice before this he had followed a short up with a sequel to be released a week later, but this is his first genuine two-parter, making a full, coherent story. Although Biograph insisted it be released as two shorts, many theatre owners cottoned on and showed it as one film.

Wisely, Griffith chose to expand upon a story he had made a loose adaptation of before, Enoch Arden having been the inspiration for 1910’s The Unchanging Sea. Covering a lengthy timescale, the material is also perfectly suited to a longer running time. Griffith clearly realised that if cinema was going to flourish as a serious and unique storytelling medium, it would not only have to develop in how it conveyed information visually, but also become more subtle and naturalistic. Around the time of Enoch Arden he was really striving to perfect this, and the two parts are like a showcase for everything he had developed so far.

Griffith opens by introducing each of the three main characters with a single title revealing their name only, followed by a shot for each which serves as a brief yet meaningful introduction. Then, without resorting to another title card, he sets up the love triangle with just some careful positioning of the three actors we have just met. This economy of expression would later be taken up and developed by Cecil B. DeMille and John Ford. The use of props by actors to reveal character or emotion is also beginning to develop. In the scene where Annie Lee watches Enoch’s boat disappear over the horizon, she stops to wipe the lens of the spyglass — perhaps to see the boat clearer, perhaps also to wipe away a tear.

Griffith was also beginning to develop the emotional impact of his camera work. He had around this time been experimenting by throwing in the occasional functional close-up to clarify an object or action. Here however, in the scene where Annie gives Enoch the baby’s curl, he briefly moves the camera closer to the actors. The close-up is not to explain the action, it is to draw the audience into it and makes us involved in this poignant moment. This is a really important breakthrough.

D.W. Griffith biodata and Filmography

On this page are listed the films directed by the pioneering American filmmaker D. W. Griffith (1875–1948). According to the Internet Movie Database, he directed 532 films between 1908 and 1931.

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._W._Griffith_filmography)

David Wark Griffith was born in rural Kentucky to Jacob “Roaring Jake” Griffith, a former Confederate Army colonel and Civil War hero. Young Griffith grew up with his father’s romantic war stories and melodramatic nineteenth-century literature that were to eventually mold his black-and-white view of human existence and history. In 1897 Griffith set out to pursue a career both acting and writing for the theater, but for the most part was unsuccessful. Reluctantly, he agreed to act in the new motion picture medium for Edwin S. Porter at the Edison Company. Griffith was eventually offered a job at the financially struggling American Mutoscope & Biograph Co., where he directed over four hundred and fifty short films, experimenting with the story-telling techniques he would later perfect in his epic The Birth of a Nation (1915).

Griffith and his personal cinematographer G.W. Bitzer collaborated to create and perfect such cinematic devices as the flash-back, the iris shot, the mask and cross-cutting. In the years following “Birth”, Griffith never again saw the same monumental success as his signature film and, in 1931, his increasing failures forced his retirement. Though hailed for his vision in narrative film-making, he was similarly criticized for his blatant racism. Griffith died in Los Angeles in 1948, one of the most dichotomous figures in film history.

His films depict the cruelty of humankind.

He has been called “the father of film technique,” “the man who invented Hollywood,” and “the Shakespeare of the screen“. In 1920, he established United Artists with Charles Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Michael Kaminsky

List of American films on IMDb (Internet Movie Database)

The Internet Movie Database (abbreviated IMDb) is an online database of information related to films, television programs, and video games, including cast, production crew, fictional characters, biographies, plot summaries, trivia and reviews. Actors and crew can post their own résumé and upload photos of themselves for a yearly fee. U.S. users can also view over 6,000 movies and television shows from CBS, Sony, and various independent film makers.

As of March 2, 2015, IMDb had 3,213,327 titles (includes episodes) and 6,411,964 personalities in its database,[2] as well as 59 million registered users and is an Alexa Top 50 site.

The site enables registered users to submit new material and request edits to existing entries. Although all data are checked before going live, the system has been open to abuse, and occasional errors are acknowledged. Users are also invited to rate any film on a scale of 1 to 10, and the totals are converted into a weighted mean-rating that is displayed beside each title, with online filters employed to deter ballot-stuffing. The site also features message boards, which stimulate regular debates among authenticated users.

(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Movie_Database)

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