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My week on Academia.edu

Message to All followers on our blog SBI-Training.com/wp, SBI-Training.blogspot.com and related Facebook pages facebook.com/sbi.training.solutions…

Since a certain time, this blog has gone viral, and I received around 100 news subsribers through various channels. Thank you for your interest and support.

Though I have shared some tips through my research experience through the series “BTSO, A New Turning Point” posted on my personal page on LinkedIn, I noticed that upon joining academia.edu as a “paid” subscriber, I got more from the analytics features on profile views.

For the last 30 days, here is a snapshot of the traffic overview of my profile : increase in Profile Views + 4,400%; increase in document views +1,117%; increase in unique visitors +900%. This means 45 profile views, 73 document views, and 60 visitors.

All those results are just not due to “luck” or “marketing gicks”. It is a pure result of hard work.

Indeed, I have started uploaded my papers on International Business, International Marketing, Organisational Behavior, Cultural Diversity, Strategic Management,  Introducation to Finance, and some of my working-in-progress (WIP) research for my book “Back to Square One”.

For the past three weeks, I am thrilled to received notifications from Academia.edu on visitors’ views and downloads of my articles. The “hottest” topic that attracted so many views is on a paper submitted in class on “international organisations and international relations” for my DBA studies at UMEF University. Wow, within one week, this paper is rank among the top 10 search results among over 55’000’000 papers. Quite impressive, isn’t it?

Well, I am not trying to boast on my work, my story of this week is just to encourage you to do the same as I have always done as a researcher: work hard, work hard, and keep on trying.

Good luck!

Anita H.

 

Study Guide for Marketing in a Global Environment

Recommendations:

In order to prepare for this course, you need to master the vocabulary of Marketing (in English). Join our English for MBA Management Basics – Next course starting on February 25, 2015. TO REGISTER, CLICK HERE.

Study Guide for Marketing in a Global Environment

CHAPTER 1

   INTERNATIONALISATION

1.1 INTERNATIONALISATION

1.2 IMPETUS

  •         1.2.1  FOREIGN CUSTOMERS
  •         1.2.2  IMPORTERS
  •         1.2.3 INTERMEDIARIES
  •         1.2.4  Other SOURCES

1.3  ATTITUDES

  •         1.3.1 OPERATING STYLE
  •         1.3.2 CULTURE

1.4  BEHAVIOR – THE INTERNATIONALISATION PROCESS

  •         1.4.1   A MODEL
  •         1.4.2  SUMMARY
  •         1.4.3 CHALLENGES TO THE MODEL

1.5 CONTEXT

1.6 THE INTERNATIONALISATION INFRASTRUCTURE

  •         1.6.1    THE EARLY STARTER
  •         1.6.2    THE LATE STARTER

1.7       REDUCING THE BARRIERS

1.8       GUIDING IDENTITY

1.9       CONCLUSION

 

CHAPTER 2

     DIFFICULTIES IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS 

2.1  PREAMBLE

  •         2.1.1  THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWLEDGE
  •         2.1.2  THE PROBLEM
  •         2.1.3  OPERATING WITH LIMITED KNOWLEDGE
  •         2.1.4  ACQUIRING THE KNOWLEDGE

2.2  THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWLEDGE

2.3 PROBLEMS IN INTERNATIONAL MARKET RESEARCH

  •        2.3.1 CAPITAL
  •        2.3.2 CURRENCY

2.4  CAPITAL – THE COST OF MARKET ENTRY

2.5  CAPITAL – THE COST OF MARKET DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE

  •          2.5.1 DIRECT INVESTMENT ABROAD
  •          2.5.2  TRANSLATION RISK
  •          2.5.3  ECONOMIC RISK
  •         2.5.4  GENERAL APPROACHES
  •         2.5.5  POLITICAL RISK – THE ACTIONS OF GOVERNMENTS
  •         2.5.6  EXTREME MEASURES BY HOST GOVERNMENTS
  •         2.5.7 INCENTIVES
  •         2.5.8  LIMITING EXPOSURE TO EXPROPRIATION
  •         2.5.9  INTER – MARKET RISK

2.6  SOURCES OF FUNDS FOR OVERSEAS SUBSIDIARIES

  •         2.6.1  THE SUBSIDIARY
  •         2.6.2  TRANSFER WITHIN GROUP
  •         2.6.3  OUTSIDE SOURCES

2.7  REDUCING THE COST OF CAPITAL

2.8  CURRENCY

  •         2.8.1  TRANSACTION RISK
  •         2.8.2  POLICY LEVEL
  •         2.8.3  INDIVIDUAL TRANSACTION

2.9  AS BUYER

2.10  ARBITRAGE

2.11  COVERING THE OPTIONS MARKET

2.12  CURRENCY BASKETS

  •          2.12.1  HOLD A BASKET OF CURRENCY
  •         2.13.2  PRICE USING A CURRENCY BASKET

CHAPTER 3

      CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION 

3.1  CULTURE AND COMMUNICATION

3.2  CULTURE

3.3  WHAT IS CULTURE

3.4  HOW DOES CULTURE AFFECT INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

  •         3.4.1 THE INTERPRETATION OF NEEDS
  •         3.4.2 THE USES TO WHICH GIVEN PRODUCTS ARE PUT
  •         3.4.3  THE MATERIAL CULTURE OF THE SOCIETY
  •         3.4.4  ATTITUDES TO TIME
  •         3.4.5 ATTITUDES TO PERSONAL SPACE
  •         3.4.6  THE USE OF SYMBOLS
  •         3.4.7  THE INTERPRETATION OF SIGNS
  •          3.4.8  THE MEANINGS OF COLOURS
  •         3.4.9  ANA EXAMPLE – NEGOTIATING IN SAUDI ARABIA
  •         3.4.10  LEVELS OF CULTURE

3.5  EXPECTATIONS

3.6 COMMUNICATION

  •         3.6.1  REDUCING RISK
  •         3.6.2  A WIDER PERSPECTIVE

3.7  NEGOTIATING

  •          3.7.1  NEGOTIATING BEHAVIOURS

3.8  PROTECTIONISM

  •          3.8.1  DEFINITION OF TERMS

3.9  EFFECTS

3.10  MITIGATING PROTECTIONISM MEASURES

 

CHAPTER 4

           APPROACHING INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

4.1  APPROACHING INTERNATIONAL MARKETING

4.2  MARKET SCANNING AND EVALUATION

  •            4.2.1 WHICH NATIONAL MARKETS?

4.3  PRODUCT / MARKET SCREENING

  •            4.3.1 ELEMENTS OF ATTRACTIVENESS

4.4  MARKET ENTRY DECISIONS

  •            4.4.1 INFORMATION FOR MARKET ENTRY
  •            4.4.2 MARKET ENTRY MODE
  •            4.4.3 SELECTING THE INTERMEDIARY
  •            4.4.4 FLEXIBILITY IN ENTRY MODE
  •            4.4.5 BASIS OF ENTRY

4.5 MARKET DEVELOPMENT AND EXPANSION

4.6 COMPETITIVE STRATEGY

  •      4.6.1 TECHNICALLY STABLE MARKETS- THE LOW COST PRODUCER
  •      4.6.2 TECHNICALLY STABLE MARKETS- THE HIGH COST PRODUCER
  •      4.6.3 TECHNICALLY UNSTABLE MARKETS- THE INNOVATOR
  •      4.6.4 TECHNICALLY UNSTABLE MARKETS- THE LOW COST INNOVATOR
  •      4.6.5 TECHNICALLY UNSTABLE MARKETS – THE HIGH COST NON-INNOVATORS
  •      4.4.6 BATTLE PLANS

4.7  CREATING AND MANAGING THE MESS

4.8  PRODUCT DIVERSIFICATION-SCOPE

4.9 GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE

4.10 PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER

  •         4.10.1 PROFIT GROWTH RATES
  •         4.10.2 PROFIT STABILITY

4.11 COUNTERTRADE

  •          4.11.1 DEFINITIONS
  •          4.11.2 FORMS OF COUNTERTRADE
  •          4.11.3 PROBLEMS WITH COUNTERTRADE

4.12 COPING WITH COMPLEXITY

4.13 REDUCING GEOGRAPHICAL SCOPE

4.14 REDUCING OPERATIONAL VARIETY

  •         4.14.1 COMPANY CHARACTERISTICS
  •         4.14.2 MARKET CHARACTERISTICS

4.15 GLOBAL MARKETING STRATEGY

4.16 DEVELOPING APROPRIATE ORGANISATIONAL FORMS

  •         4.16.1 HOME MARKET
  •         4.16.2 MULTI- DOMESTIC

4.17 SUMMARY

CHAPTER 5

INTERACTION AND NETWORKS-A CONTEXTUAL APPROACH TO INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DEALINGS 

5.1 INTRODUCTION

5.2 MARKET POSITION

5.3 RELATIONSHIP QUALITY

5.4 RELATIONSHIPS IN INTERNATIONAL-MARKETING

5.5 INVESTING IN RELATIONSHIP

5.6 RECIPROCITY

5.7 LIFE CYCLES

  •                 5.7.1 PRE-RELATIONSHIP
  •                 5.7.2 EARLY RELATIONSHIP
  •                 5.7.3 DEVELOPMENT
  •                5.7.4 LONG TERM STAGE
  •                 5.7.5 THE FINAL STAGE

5.8 RELATIONSHIP STRENGTH

5.9 TIGHTLY AND LOOSELY  STRUCTURED NETWORKS

5.10 INDIRECT RELATIONS

5.11 NETWORK MAPPING

  •               5.11.1 DISTANCE
  •               5.11.2 QUALITY
  •               5.11.3 BREADTH
  •               5.11.4 THE BASIS OF CONNECTION

5.12 MULTIPLE RELATIONSHIPS

5.13 CONNECTION

  •              5.13.1 CONNECTED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUPPLIERS
  •              5.13.2 CONNECTED RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CUSTOMERS
  •              5.13.1 SUPPLIER- CUSTOMER-END USER CONNECTIONS

5.14 NETWORKING

  •               5.14.1 BYPASS
  •               5.14.2 COALESCE
  •               5.14.3 BRIDGE
  •               5.14.4 DISPLACE
  •               5.14.5 ELABORATE
  •               5.14.6 BLOCK

5.15  SUMMARY

CHAPTER 6

     APPLYING THE INTERACTION / NETWORK APPROACHES

6.1 STARTING OUT

6.2 A DIFFERENT START

6.3 STEP ONE-POSITIONAL AUDIT

6.4 STEP TWO- COMPETENCE ENHANCEMENT

6.5 STEP THREE-MARKET SCANNING AND EVALUATION

  •             6.5.1 NETWORK COMPOSITION AND SCOPE
  •             6.5.2 IMPLICATIONS
  •             6.5.3 MARKET RESEARCH

6.6 STEP FOUR-MARKET ENTRY

  •            6.6.1 DIRECT ENTRY
  •            6.6.2 UNCERTAINLY
  •            6.6.3 INFLUENCE TACTICS
  •            6.6.4 WHICH CUSTOMERS?
  •            6.6.5 PORTFOLIO THEORY
  •            6.6.6 SUMMARY HINTS ON DIRECT ENTRY
  •            6.6.7 THE ROLE OF SUBSIDIARIES

6.7 INDIRECT ENTRY

  •            6.7.1 IMPLICATIONS
  •            6.7.2 SUMMARY HINTS ON RELATIONSHIPS WITH INTERMEDIARIES

6.8 BLENDS

6.9 MARKET DEVELOPMENT AND MAINTENANCE

  •            6.9.1 BEING THE RIGHT PLACE AT THE RIGHT TIME

6.10 CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

  • 4.1 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SELECTION OF INTEGRATED OR INDEPENDENT MARKETING/DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS
  • 4.2 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CHOICE OF EXPANSION STRATEGY
  • 4.3 STRATEGIC OPTIONS OPEN TO LOW AND HIGH COST PRODUCERS IN MARKETS WITH DIFFERING RATES OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE

Recommendations:

In order to prepare for this course, you need to master the vocabulary of Marketing (in English). Join our English for MBA Management Basics – Next course starting on February 25, 2015. TO REGISTER, CLICK HERE.